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  The Sinking of the Liner Ettrick  November 15, 1942
 Beaton, Joseph Alex V/26206 Able Seaman HMS Quebec, Royal Canadian Naval Volunteer Reserve; (Troop Transport Ettrick)   Date of Death: November 15, 1942 Aged: 18 Memorial: Halifax Memorial Joseph was the son of John Hector and Mary Beaton, of Low Point, Inverness Co., Nova Scotia.  Joseph was born in Halifax, NS on January 14, 1924. Commemorated on Page 57 Merchant Navy Book of Remembrance Displayed in the Memorial Chamber of the Peace Tower in Ottawa on February 10
Remembering three Nova Scotians  (Royal Canadian Naval Volunteer Reserve)  lost in the sinking of the Liner Ettrick
 Robertson, Charles Kenneth 3615 Able Seaman HMS Quebec, Royal Canadian Naval Volunteer Reserve; (Troop Transport Ettrick)   Date of Death: November 15, 1942 Aged: 20 Memorial: Halifax Memorial Charles was the son of  Charles H. and Thelma Agnes Robertson of Sydney, Nova Scotia.  He joined the Canadian Navy in May 1940. Commemorated on Page 110 Merchant Navy Book of Remembrance Displayed in the Memorial Chamber of the Peace Tower in Ottawa on March 8
 Slauenwhite, Donald Joseph V/25787 Leading Stoker HMS Quebec, Royal Canadian Naval Volunteer Reserve; (Troop Transport Ettrick)   Date of Death: November 15, 1942 Aged: 26 Memorial: Halifax Memorial Donald was the son of Frederick and Grace Slauenwhite, of Halifax, Nova Scotia. Commemorated on Page 114 Merchant Navy Book of Remembrance Displayed in the Memorial Chamber of the Peace Tower in Ottawa on March 10
The Ettrick, owned by P&O Steam Navigation Co Ltd, London was requisitioned by the British Admiralty in 1939 for troop transport. Operation Torch, the first Anglo-American amphibious operation in WW2, was an invasion by British and American troops of French North Africa started on November 8, 1942. The Ettrick was one of the troop transport ships used by the allies in the Operation.  Having successfully landed the troops, the fleet of liners used to transport the invading force from Britain to Algeria was subject to U-boats attacks on the return voyage. Eight of the ships, including the Ettrick, were sunk by enemy attack. At 4:14 am on the morning of November 15, U-155  attacked the convoy 120 miles north west of Gibraltar. The Ettrick was sunk with the loss of six crew and eighteen naval ratings. The Captain, and two hundred and four crew members, forty-one gunners and sixty-six naval rating were rescued. Among the dead were Joseph Beaton, Charles Robertson, and Donald Slauenwhile, returning to HMS Quebec, No. 1 Combined Training Centre, at Inveraray, Scotland.  HMS Quebec trained army and navy service personnel in the use of minor landing craft for landing assault troops, supplies, ammunition and weaponry onto heavily defended enemy occupied beaches. All three were in training at HMS Quebec and returning from Operation Torch.
IWM (A 29892) HMS Quebec