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  162 Squadron - RCAF Station Yarmouth  West Camp Aircraft:  Canso “A” No. 9737 Crashed at Gander, Newfoundland
January 7, 1943
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January 7, 1943 Crash  162 Squadron
Crew: Small, N. E. [Squadron Leader; 113 Squadron] Pilot Died in crash Tingle, A. M. [Flying Officer; 162 Squadron] Co-Pilot Died in crash Hudson, D. L.  [Flight Sergeant; 162 Squadron] Navigator Died in crash Mangan, J. T.  [Flight Sergeant; 162 Squadron] 1st Wireless Air Gunner Died in crash White, H. E.  [Sergeant; 162 Squadron] 2nd Engineer Died in crash Banning, J. E. V.  [Flight Sergeant; 162 Squadron] 2nd Wireless Air Gunner  Survived the crash Wilson, W. E. [Sergeant; 162 Squadron] 1st Engineer Survived the crash On January 6, 1943 Squadron Leader Small, Co-Pilot Tingle, Navigator Hudson, Wireless Air Gunners Mangan and White and Engineers Banning and Wilson boarded Canso 9837. The plane was loaded with fuel, ammunition and depth charges to within a few pounds of its maximum allowable 34,000 lb take-off weight. At 6.45 am, the aircraft departed and began to climb. As they crossed Gander Lake they experienced the same severe turbulence reported by another aircraft that had left a little earlier. The up and down drought were so severe as to cause changes in altitude as much as 300 feet in either direction. The aircraft began to fall very fast, with a tilt and a slide to starboard and then it started to clip the tops of trees in rising ground and cut a swath as it plowed through the trees for about 200 feet.  At a flat angle of approach before the wings were ripped off. The hull and engines continued another 300 feet, then turned over and caught fire. F/Sgt Benning, the flight engineer dropped out of his seat in the "tower" and fell to the ground, while Wilson who had been in the "fitters" seat, below him, was thrown clear of the wreckage. Benning's ribs were broken and Wilson had lacerations to his head and face and both were thoroughly shook up. They looked for other survivors but found no sign of life in or around the burning wreckage, and it was obvious the other crew members had been killed on impact. After daybreak they searched and found an emergency ration kit, two personnel kits and two dinghies. The area was covered in deep snow and they didn’t know how far they were from Gander Lake so they decided to make a lean-to from the salvaged tems and wait for rescue. During that day and the following night, several aircraft, including Trans Canada Airlines, flew over them and each time they fired a distress flare but but it didn't attract attention. The next day they realized there would be no quick rescue and decided to try and make their own way to the Lake. It was heavy going and they didn't reach the lake until late that evening. They followed the shoreline to a point opposite the US Army wharf an lit a fire and waited. Later that night they saw the lights of a car coming down the road to the wharf and realizing this might be their salvation they fired off a flare. Shortly after this an aircraft took off from the airport and as it circled their position they fired another flare. A boat soon came over and picked them and they were taken to the RCAF hospital and treated for their injuries. Meanwhile back at Gander the #5 Squadron Daily Diary for January 7, 1943 had the following entry: S/L Small has not returned from patrol and great anxiety is felt. It was his intention to go some 600 to 700 miles to sea and it is felt he had now run out of gas short of the airport. 3 Canso and a Flying Fortress from Ferry Command are out, also aircraft from Torbay, Goose Bay and Yarmouth. A ground party reached the wreckage the next day and the bodies were recovered.  A Board of Inquiry investigated the accident but could not establish an exact cause of the accident. Source: rootsweb.com    Norville Everett Small [D.F.C., A.F.C.] Squadron Leader Small was the son of Adolph and Minnie Small, of Toronto, Ontario and husband of Jean M. Small, of Vancouver, British Columbia. Date of Death: January 7, 1943 Service No. C/1379  Age at Death: 33 Cemetery: Gander War Cemetery Grave Reference: Plot 3. Row 1. Grave 7   Commemorated on Page 214 of the Second World War Book of Remembrance Displayed in the Memorial Chamber of the Peace Tower in Ottawa on April 30 Sources: Commonwealth War Graves Commission Veterans Affairs Canada   John Thomas Mangan John Thomas Mangan was the son of Charles and Elizabeth Mangan, of North Bay, Ontario. Rank: Pilot Officer    Service No:  J/23805 Date of Death: January 7, 1943   Age at Death: 23 Cemetery: Gander War Cemetery (Plot 2. Row 6. Grave 10)        Commemorated on Page 186 of the Second World War Book of Remembrance Displayed in the Memorial Chamber of the Peace Tower in Ottawa on April 16 Sources: Commonwealth War Graves Commission Veterans Affairs Canada      Harold Ernest White     Harold Ernest White was the son of John T. White and Ethel E. White, of Saint John, New Brunswick. Rank: Sergeant Service No:  R/84515 Age at Death: 29 Cemetery: Gander War Cemetery (Plot 2. Row 6. Grave 11) Commemorated on Page 226 of the Second World War Book of Remembrance Displayed in the Memorial Chamber of the Peace Tower in Ottawa on May 13 Sources: Commonwealth War Graves Commission Veterans Affairs Canada                  Aubrey Maxwell Tingle   Aubrey Maxwell Tingle was the son of Cyril N. Tingle and Beryl B. Tingle, of Chilliwack, British Columbia.  Aubrey joined the R.C.A.F. in May 1940 and received his pilot wings at Carberry, Manitoba. Initially he served on the West Coast at Patricia Bay, Vancouver Island. He was then stationed on the East Coast, and flew out of Yarmouth, Nova Scotia, where he was engaged in flying patrols for over a year.  During this time Aubrey returned to the West Coast to fly the first bomber made by Boeing in Vancouver to the East Coast. On January 1, 1943 he was mentioned in despatches for distinguished service with 162 Squadron. Rank:  Flying Officer Service No:  J/5767 Date of Death:  January 7, 1943 Age at Death: 28 Cemetery: Gander War Cemetery (Plot 3. Row 2. Grave 13)                  Commemorated on Page 220 of the Second World War Book of Remembrance Displayed in the Memorial Chamber of the Peace Tower in Ottawa on May 10 Sources: Commonwealth War Graves Commission Veterans Affairs Canada  Donald Leslie Hudson   Donald Leslie Hudson was the son of Joseph and Ellen Hudson, of Saskatoon, Saskatchewan and husband of Vera M. Hudson, of Innisfail, Alberta. Rank: Pilot Officer Service No:  J/23800 Age at Death: 29 Cemetery: Gander War Cemetery (Plot 1. Row 2. Grave 17)   Commemorated on Page 172 of the Second World War Book of Remembrance Displayed in the Memorial Chamber of the Peace Tower in Ottawa on April 9 Sources: Commonwealth War Graves Commission Veterans Affairs Canada
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